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National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment

  • 4/1/2019
    Campuses are utilizing technology in innovative ways to enhance teaching and learning. For example, the Foothill-De Anza Community College District is improving course accessibility by transcribing lectures in-real time through online portals so students requiring sign language interpretation can follow and also keep a record of the lesson on their electronic device.
  • 4/1/2019

    A new report from NASPA, "Employing Student Success: A Comprehensive Examination of On-Campus Student Employment," rethinks work-study programs to better motivate learners to graduate and prepare them for their careers. A few of the suggestions are to facilitate student employees' self-evaluation of work experiences, give them clear guidelines and feedback, and provide professional development opportunities. Another article on the NASPA study can be found in The Hechinger Report.

  • 4/1/2019
    Inflexible, unmeasurable, and restrictive learning outcomes statements can be dreadful for both learners and instructors. This article offers various questions to ask yourself when constructing learning outcomes statements for the course-level.
  • 3/25/2019
    Educational practices and policies that promote equity should be open to ensuring that all learning counts regardless of where it is acquired to facilitate progress towards high-quality credentials. In addition, pathways that allow learners to flow in, through, and out of various educational experiences without roadblocks or miscommunication are essential. Both of these efforts require collaboration, and issues impacting race/ethnicity must be at the center of the conversation.
  • 3/25/2019
    Utilizing principles that promote transparency in teaching and learning, Tanya Martini from Brock University added specific, explicit language to assignment prompts that would push her students to connect how the assignment developed and transferred certain skills.
  • 3/25/2019
    High-Impact Practices (HIPs) are a variety of educational experiences that deepen learning and further engage students, which can take place both inside and outside of the classroom. This edition of the Teaching newsletter focuses on considerations we need to make in order to meaningfully leverage HIPs at the course-level.
  • 3/12/2019

    The reauthorization of the Higher Education Act must address issues that affect today's learners, of which promoting access to quality education and equity in opportunity are two key factors. Ensuring student success, especially when it relates to the success of students of color, requires additional federal financial support. A similar article can be found in Inside Higher Ed.

  • 3/12/2019
    McMaster University's engineering department requires all new faculty members to complete a two-day Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) that incorporates learning, practice, peer-mentoring, and reflection to explore topics such as planning, active learning, effective feedback, and pedagogy. The workshop has motivated both new and existing faculty to improve their teaching effectiveness.
  • 3/12/2019
    Dr. Michael L. Lomax, President and CEO of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF), delivered the inaugural State of the HBCU Address setting forth a full legislative agenda for the 116th Congress. The address also highlighted HBCU's ability to drive students' socioeconomic mobility and provide the country with an educated, diverse workforce.
  • 3/5/2019UNC Charlotte writer UNC Charlotte by UNC Charlotte published by UNC Charlotte

    Please take a few minutes to help identify and prioritize "grand challenges" facing assessment professionals. The identification of grand challenges can be a useful process that unifies the efforts of practitioners in a field. Unified efforts increase the possibility of creating meaningful and lasting progress. The Office of Assessment and Accreditation at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte reviewed major assessment websites, blogs, discussion boards and publications to identify potential grand challenges that have been discussed actively over the past few years. Using these resources they articulated 10 areas for growth they believe may represent grand challenges for our field. Your responses to a brief survey will help to better frame our understanding of the grand challenges in assessment. Use this link to complete the survey by April 1, 2019.

  • 3/5/2019

    The T3 Innovation Network, which works towards building the necessary technology infrastructure to allow employers, students, and educators to better communicate their respective skill needs, mastery, and education efforts. The Network is now in Phase 2, where ten pilot projects will help inform the data systems and standards needed to better align these data. A webinar recording of the Phase 2 kickoff is available.

  • 2/19/2019

    A new ACE report, Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: A Status Report, finds that while access to higher education has continue to increase for students of color, there are still persistent completion, data representation, and support issues affecting student groups. In addition, the number of faculty, staff, and administrators of color in colleges and universities are disproportionately low compared to the proportion of students of color walking across those college gates.

  • 2/19/2019

    The January/February 2019 issue of Assessment Update is now available. This special issue focuses on the Excellence in Assessment (EIA) Designation, and includes articles from our 2018 designees: the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Northern Arizona University, Bowie State University (the first HBCU EIA Designee), Harper College, and Mississippi State University. Also included is a NILOA Perspectives piece on assessment committees.

  • 2/19/2019

    The 2019 Teaching and Learning National Institute is now accepting team applications. The institute offers many benefits including contextualized, project-based professional learning opportunities to get better at how you use data to design change initiatives that improve the quality of student experiences, assess them, and plan subsequent steps. Applications are due May 1.

  • New NILOA Logo!
    1/16/2019

    We are happy to introduce the new NILOA logo! It is inspired by both the NILOA Transparency Framework and the continuous, interconnected motion of the assessment process.

    NILOA logo

  • 1/14/2019

    A new book How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories Behind Effective College Teaching offers educators numerous tips on how to reframe and approach course topics to better engage learners. Included among these tips are ways to effectively use group work and emphasize feedback over grades.

  • 1/14/2019
    David Hollander, assistant dean of Real World in the School of Professional Studies at New York University, discusses why colleges and universities need to better prepare students to be lifelong learners. Simply equipping students with specific skills might not be enough to ensure their long-term success in a work environment that rapidly changes.
  • 1/14/2019
    This report explores how pre-employment assessment is changing, and will continue to change, in the U.S. There are skills gaps between employers' needs and employees' capabilities along with differing pathways from education to the workforce further complicating the ecosystem. Discussion is given to emerging trends, useful platforms, potential barriers, and opportunities to build upon this work.
  • 1/8/2019
    Shifting the focus of assessment from one that aims to segment and compare students towards one that aims to support deeper learning can have equitable returns, argues Ann Jaquith, the associate director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE).
  • 1/8/2019
    Through reflection, experiences can transform into knowledge which can inform practice. Being a reflective educator can not only help to inform pedagogical improvements, but it might be an important element of good teaching.